Review: An Enchantment of Ravens

An Enchantment of Ravens

 

If I said it once, I’ve said it a hundred times: stunning covers like this always make me want to read the story. I don’t care what it is about because I want it in my hands. Well, my darlings, do not let this cover fool you. This story was just ho-hum at the very best of times. The rest of the time it read like every other fae story out today.

Short recap: Isobel has a gift for painting human emotions into the paintings of her fae clients. The fae love anything and everything that is a human craft as they cannot do that on their own (cook food, clean laundry, etc). But when the mysterious Rook has his painting done. Isobel is swept away by Rook into the Fae lands to answer for the crime she has committed.

Are you as confused as I am? I sort of understood that Isobel (not her real name, by the way) had a gift for painting portraits but the fact that she could paint emotions into them baffled me. Why was that such a big deal to the Fae community? Did they not express emotions themselves? And then for Rook, the mysterious Fae prince, to wish Isobel away for crimes against him just had me scratching my head. So what if she painted emotion into his likeness? I never understood why that was such a big deal. Maybe it was explained and I missed it, or maybe it was supposed to be a conclusion I came to on my own (I never did, in case you were wondering). Either way, that made zero sense to me.

The other thing that stood out to me was the dreaded instalove. GAH! My arch nemesis! It burns! It burns! I cannot stand instalove but yet there it was, bold as brass. Instead of the romance between Isobel and Rook developing gradually and naturally, Rogerson made it instalove from the start. Yes, their relationship does continue to develop over the course of the story but to force it upon me from the very start made me disbelieve it even more.

I’m still at a loss of words for this story. I wanted to like it so much more but there was no way I could. When the story morphed into an adventure through the fairylands it quickly became every other fae story that is out and has been out. Nothing felt original or unique. The fae characters had the same qualities: they had to bow if someone bowed to them; they were wearing glamours to hide any imperfections; they spoke in riddles; the food they offered to humans guaranteed the humans would be trapped in the fairyland; magic spells spoken by fae people often had loopholes; etc. You get the idea. It had all been done before many many times. I grew bored while reading those parts because I felt as if I was reading plagiarized work from another author. Cruel to say but nevertheless true.

I did not enjoy this like I thought I would. The ending left me wondering what the hell was going on and what happened. I’m almost kicking myself for not DNFing this when I lost interest the first time. This was one of my most anticipated reads yet I walked away feeling completely disappointed. I really wanted so much more from it. In good faith I cannot recommend this to anyone. Do not fall victim to pretty covers like I did.

 

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